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End-of-May link dump

By Paul Watson on .

Wood Witch, by the Hare and the Moon

The Burning Matter of English Witches

The image of the witch being burnt for her crimes is a familiar one, well established in the popular imagination. It might be surprising to learn therefore, that although a frequent occurrence in Scotland and on the Continent, there were only a handful of suspected witches burnt in England, and even those few that come down to us through various sources cannot always be verified…

Philip Ob Rey Builds Apocalyptic Giants Out Of VHS Tape In Desolate Landscapes

At the end of the world, if all of our waste, memories, and collective knowledge were to be resurrected into living masses, it would look something like this…

Electronic Music And Mental Illness In Cinema

From its very earliest occurrences, electronic instrumentation and music has been used in cinema to signpost various aspects of mental health problems and issues within diegetic characters. Alongside its uses in creating alien worlds, electronic instrumentation seems to, at least in the eyes of the films’ creators, have an ability to go deep within the human psyche as well as far out into space…

Atlas of True Names (British Isles Isles of the Tattooed)

The Atlas of True Names reveals the etymological roots, or original meanings, of the familiar terms on today's maps of the World, Europe, the British Isles, Canada and the United States…

Jack-in-the-Green 2015

The Company of the Green Man gathers, archives and makes freely available information, images and folklore about the green man and the traditional Jack-in-the-Green…

Introducing: The ‘English Eerie’ Of Holloway

Featured in the Guardian and working alongside one of Britain’s finest authors, The Double Negative writer and freelance filmmaker Adam Scovell channels a very English kind of terror in his new short film, Holloway…

Unheimlich Folk: The Hare And The Moon – Wood Witch (Reverb Worship) album review

Folk music, in its essence, is like sonic recombinant DNA, running through our veins like saltwater, rife for reinterpretation. It’s a crude golem putty, to be cast into strange shambling halflife, from the devilpact Delta blues, to blue-eyed Appalachian lament, to Balkan forelore, to the misty isles of Albion. It almost doesn’t matter what country you grew up in, there’s a distant, irresistible call to traditional music, as if you’ve heard it somewhere before…

I bought this CD on the basis of that review, and it hasn’t disappointed.